Rule of Adjective & Adverbs for Errors Spotting


Rules of Adjective

Word qualifying a noun or pronoun is called an Adjective.

1. 

The Comparative adjectives ending in –ior (Prior, Junior, Senior, Superior, Inferior, Posterior), Prefer(verb), Preferable, Elder etc are followed by ‘to’ instead of ‘than’
Example – 
i) He is senior to me
ii) Milk is preferable to tea.


2. 

Some adjective doesn’t admit of any comparison and thus they always remain in the positive degree: Absolute, Annual, Chief, Circular, Complete, Entire, Eternal, Extreme, Excellent, Full, Impossible, Perfect, Right, Round, Unique, Universal, Supreme, Whole etc.
Example– 
I) This is the unique building that I have seen.

3. 

When two adjectives qualify the same noun, both the adjectives should be expressed in the same degree.
Example – 
He is wiser and more intelligent than his brother.

4. 

When we compare two qualities in the same person or thing, the comparative ending -er is not used.
Example – 
He is more clever than honest.

5. 

Either, Neither, Only, Both, even, but also should be placed immediately before the word they emphasize.
Example – 
he likes to take not only coffee but also tea.

6. 

When two adjectives require different prepositions, appropriate prepositions should be used with both adjectives.
Example – 
His mobile is different from and cheaper than mine.

7. 

Double comparatives and double superlatives must not be used.
Example – 
He is wiser than his brother.

8. 

When two changes happen together, comparative degree is used in both.
Example –
The higher you go, the cooler you feel.

9. 

While comparing an object with others, it is necessary to exclude it from the comparison.
Example – 
Iron is harder than any other metal.

10. 

We should not use ‘other’ or ‘else’ with superlatives.
Example – 
He is the strongest of all students (not all other students).

11. 

‘Kind’ and ‘Sort’ refer singular number. We can use ‘this’ and ‘that’ with them, but we can’t use ‘these’ and ‘those’ with them.
Example – 
He doesn’t like that kind of shirts.

12. 

Compound adjective formed by adding ‘worth’ is placed after the noun it qualifies.
Example – 
This is a sight worth seeing.

13. 

When two or more comparatives are joined by ‘and’, they must be in the same degree.
Example – 
Ram is wisest and most learned boy in the class.

14. 

Likely, certain and sure are followed by ‘to’.
Example – 
He is likely to win.

15. 

Always place an adjective after noun when the noun is followed by preposition.
Example – 
The subject is a matter worthy of note.

16. 

The order of adjectives qualifying a noun – SIZE-SHAPE-AGE-COLOUR-NATIONALITY- MATERIAL-NOUN (S S A C N M)
Example – 
A big Indian stadium.

17. 

Some Confused Adjectives: 
I. Beautiful is used for woman, Handsome is for man.
II. Less refers to quantity, Fewer denotes number.
III. Last is final one, Latest is last up to the present.
IV. Older is used for persons or things, Elder is used for persons only.
V. Little means not much, A little means at least some.
VI. Farther means more distance, further means additional one.

Errors in use of Adverb:

Adverb are word that add information about the verb.

Rules of Adverb –

1. 

Adverb of time – Often, always, already, just, never, ever, sometimes, frequently, generally, recently, usually, seldom, hardly rarely, normally etc are placed before the verb they modify.
Example – 
he often goes to Delhi.

2. 

The adverb ‘enough’ is placed after the adjective.
Example – 
she is cunning enough to tackle him.

3. 

When there are two adverb of place, the smaller unit is usually placed first.
Example – 
Rahul lives in a small village in Bihar.

4. 

If a sentence is introduced by an adverb, inverted form of the adverb is used.
Example – 
Seldom does he visit his uncle.
No sooner did I reach the station Than I met my friend.

5. 

‘Else’ should be followed by ‘But’
Example – 
It is nothing else but sheer madness.


6. 

‘Seldom or never’, ‘Seldom, if ever’, ‘little or nothing’, ‘little, if anything’ is correct form.
Example – 
Deb seldom or ever meet his relatives.


7. 

Negative adverbs should not be used with the negative meaning word.
Avoid the use of negative with until, unless, lest.

8. 

‘Scarcely’ and ‘Hardly’ are followed by ‘When’ not by ‘Then’.
Example – 
I had scarcely entered the room when the light off.


9. 

‘Though’ is followed by ‘yet’ not by ‘but’
Example – 
Though he is poor, yet he is honest.


10. 

‘Lest’ must be followed by ‘Should’.
Example – 
Read regularly lest you should fail.

11. 

‘Very’ is used with the adjective in the positive degree and with present participles.
‘Much’ is used with adjectives in the comparative degree and with past participles.
Example – 
It is very interesting book.
He is very much stronger than I am.


12. 

Adverb ‘as’ should be used to introduce predicative of the verbs, ‘regard, describe, define, treat, view, know’. But ‘as’ should be avoided with ‘name, elect, think, consider, call, appoint, make, choose’.
Example – 
He was elected the secretary of our club.

13. 

‘Unless’ expresses condition. ‘Until’ expresses time. They always used in negative sense. Thus not is never used with ‘unless’ and ‘until’.
RBI Grade B Online Classes by Ramandeep Singh - Join here

Join 40,000+ readers and get free notes in your email

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks for commenting. It's very difficult to answer every query here, it's better to post your query on IBPSToday.com