Most Confusing English Adjective Made Easy: Part 2

Other, another, any other, no other:

Other: we use this word in a sentence before singular/plural countable noun in the meaning of (दूसरा या अन्य)

Example

  • I’d love to own a pet on the other hand taking care of the animal is a very big responsibility. (√) 
  • If your spouse or other family members are in need, lend them a helping hand. (√) 

Another: We use this word before singular countable noun and we can’t use (an) before another because (an + other = another) that’s why we don’t use an before another.
If we see any numeral adj. in a sentence with another, we have to use plural noun after it.
We can’t use another in a negative sentence instead of it we can use any other. It means we use another in a positive sentence.
We use any other in the meaning of (कोई अन्य) and no other in the meaning of (कोई अन्य नहीं) it means in no other we have already negativity so can’t use any other negative word with it.

Example

  • Do you have an another pen? (×) 
  • Do you have another pen? (√) 

  • I have bought an another house. (×) 
  • I have bought another house. (√) 

  • You have to wait for another ten day. (×) 
  • You have to wait for another ten days. (√) 

  • I don’t want to buy other house. (×) 
  • I don’t want to buy any other house. (√) 

  • Usain Bolt is faster than another runner. (×) 
  • Usain Bolt is faster than any other runner. (√) 

  • Any other runner of the world is as fast as Usain Bolt. (×) 
  • No other runner of the world is as fast as Usain Bolt. (√) 

All and Whole:

All: we use this word before plural countable noun or singular uncountable noun in the sense of (सब या सब के सब)
Whole: we use this word before singular noun in the meaning of (सम्पूर्ण)

Difference:

I. We use all to explain the no. of people and things while we use whole to explain the whole part of a specific person or a thing.
II. Whole is used for singular common noun and whole of is used for proper noun.

Example

  • Whole friends of mine came to meet me in the hospital. (×) 
  • All my friends came to meet me in the hospital. (√) 

  • Whole money has been spent. (×) 
  • All money has been spent. (√) 

  • Whole gold was duplicate. (×) 
  • All gold was duplicate. (√) 

  • Her all body was covered. (×) 
  • Her whole body was covered. (√) 

  • The whole of country is beautiful. (×) 
  • The whole country is beautiful. (√) 

  • The whole U.S. is beautiful. (×) 
  • The whole of U.S. is beautiful. (√) 

Either and Neither:

Either: we use this word for singular countable noun in the meaning of (दो में से कोई एक). If we want use this word with plural countable noun, we have to add (of) with it means we can use either of for plural countable noun.

Example

  • Either car is mine. (√) 
  • Either of the cars is mine. (√) 

Neither: we use this word for singular countable noun in the meaning of (दो में से कोई नहीं). If we want to use neither for plural countable noun, we have to use (of) with it.

Example

  • Neither girl is beautiful. 
  • Neither of the students is intelligent. 

Note: we use these words also in conjunction as correlative conjunction i.e. either or, neither nor and at that time we will use the form of verb according to the 2nd subject.

Some and Any:

Both words have the same meaning (कोई, कुछ और थोडा) but the difference in the use of these words.
Some: we use this word in an affirmative sentence for the quantity of a singular uncountable noun and before plural countable noun to explain the no.
Any: we use this word in a negative sentence for the quantity before a singular uncountable noun and before singular and plural countable noun to explain the no.

Note:
I. We can use some in the sense of about (लगभग).
II. We can’t use no and any in a single sentence because both are adjectives.

Example

  • Ha wants any coffee. (×) 
  • He doesn’t want any coffee. (√) 
  • He wants some coffee. (√) 

  • Put any sugar in my tea. (×) 
  • Put some sugar in my tea. (√) 

  • I have no any money. (×) 
  • I have not any money. (√) 

Junior, Inferior, Anterior:

We use these words in the form of positive degree’s adjective.
We will always use to with these words instead of (than).
We use these words as a countable noun means we can use these words in the plural form also.

Example

  • He is senior/junior than me. (×) 
  • He is senior/junior to me. (√) 
  • We should obey our seniors. (√) 

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