Important Rules of Conjunctions For Error Spotting: Part 2

Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join equal elements of a sentence together, like "either/or", “neither/nor” and "not only/but also", “lest/should”, “so/as” etc.

1. Lest-Should

Lest……should
"Not" is included in the word "lest"
It has negativity in itself so we can’t use "not" with this word in a sentence.
Lest meaning: ऐसा न हो कि|
For example: 
  • Do it lest they would turn out you. (×) 
  • Do it lest they should turn out you. (√) 
  • Work hard lest you should not fail. (×) 
  • Work hard lest you should fail. (√) 

2. So-As

So……as
(इतना) (जितना)
It shows negativity in a sentence. We use these words to show negativity 

For example:
  • She is not as intelligent as I. (×) 
  • She is not so intelligent as I. (√) 
  • Nothing is as good as we think. (×) 
  • Nothing is so good as we think. (√) 

As… as (it shows positivity in a sentence)
(इतना) (जितना)
For example: 
  • She looks so beautiful as a princess. (×) 
  • She looks as beautiful as a princess. (√) 
  • She is so tall as her mother. (×) 
  • She is as tall as her mother. (√) 

3. Other-Than

Other …….than
Sometimes in an exam, we can see "other" with "but" in a sentence and ignore this without thinking 

For example: 
  • In chess, no other player but Magnus Carlsen has a great confidence. (×) 
  • In chess, no other player than Magnus Carlsen has a great confidence. (√) 
  • She is no other but my sister. (×) 
  • She is no other than my sister. (√) 

4. Either-or/ Neither-nor/ Not only-but also

There can be three types of error in these conjunctions for instance: 

(i). We can’t use either with nor and neither with or.
For example: 
  • Either you nor your brother has won the prize. (×) 
  • Either you or your brother has won the prize. (√) 
  • Neither he or his brother can walk faster than I. (×) 
  • Neither he nor his brother can walk faster than I. (√) 

(ii). These words always use with uncommon part of the sentence.
For example: 
  • Not only he plays the guitar but also the piano. (×) 
  • He not only plays the guitar but also the piano. (√) 
  • India will either make a good relationship with China or Pakistan. (×)  
  • India will make a good relationship either with China or Pakistan. (√) 

(iii). Verb according to the first subject.
For example: 
Neither Duryodhana nor Pandavs were ready to stop the war. (×) 
Neither Duryodhana nor Pandavs was ready to stop the war. (√) 


5. As long as/with/Along with/Together
When we add two subjects with these words, then we need to focus on the form of verb because in these types of sentences we should use verb according to the first subject.

For example: 
  • He with his friends are leaving for Delhi.(×) 
  • He with his friends is leaving for Delhi. (√) 
  • Facebook, as well as Whatsapp, have provided GIF nowadays.(×) 
  • Facebook, as well as Whatsapp, has provided GIF nowadays. (√)  

6. Else-but
These words have negative meaning. The only auxiliary verb that can follow "else" is but.
For example: 
  • He demanded nothing else than a mobile. (×) 
  • He demanded nothing else but a mobile. (√) 
  • Don’t walk on the corner of the roof otherwise/else/or else you will not slip. (×)  
  • Don’t walk on the corner of the roof otherwise/else/or else you will slip.(√) 

7. Whether….or
Meaning: कि क्या
Whether is always followed by "or" in a sentence and  we can’t use "that" before whether

Ex:
  • I just want to know that whether you go there or not. (×) 
  • I just want to know whether you go there or not. (√)  
  • I asked her that whether her father was at home.(×) 
  • I asked her whether her father was at home. (√) 

8. As if/as though 
Meaning: मानो
(Subject+v1+as if/as though + subject + were+…..)
We use as if and as though to make comparisons. They have a similar meaning. We use as if and as though to talk about an imaginary situation or a situation that may not be true but that is likely or possible. As if is more common than as though

For example: 
  • He acts as if he is a prince. (×)  
  • He acts as if he were a prince. (√) 
  • He lay down, as if dead. (×) 
  • He lay down as if he were dead.(√) 

9. The reason/why…that 
After the reason/the reason why we must use "that" in a sentence because sometimes we can see "due to, because, on account of" etc. after the reason/the reason why

For example: 
  • The reason why I don’t want to meet him is because he has betrayed my friend. (×) 
  • The reason why I don’t want to meet him is that he has betrayed my friend. (√) 
  • The reason for the bus being late was because the bus was involved in an accident. (×)  
  • The reason for the bus being late was that the bus was involved in an accident. (√) 

10. Unless: 
It is used as a conjunction in the meaning of (if not) – condition/situation
Until: it used for time
These words have negativity in themselves so we can’t use "not" with them.
For example: 
  • Unless she does not mend her behaviour, I shall send her out. (×) 
  • Unless she mends her behaviour, I shall send her out. (√) 
  • Until I do not inform my father I shall not go out of my house. (×)  
  • Until I inform my father I shall not go out of my house. (√) 

Read Part 1 Here
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